The Eco-Friendly Alternatives to Traditional Building Materials

In the recent years, green building has risen into popularity with new homeowners looking for new ways to potentially lower energy costs and thus, limit impact on the environment. To meet this increasing demand, home builders and interior designers have found a better option in employing the use of alternative building materials in construction.

Today, the use of sustainable building materials is on the rise. Some of these are made out of natural materials while others are designed to use resources in the most efficient manner. Regardless of the objective, there are many reasons why contractors and homeowners should switch to green building.

 

Why Invest in Sustainable Building Materials?

Energy conservation has significantly become a top priority amongst the world population. In fact, a 2016 World Green Building Trends report by Dodge Data and Analytics, green building is officially a global trend – a shift that is driven by consumer demands. It is even expected to significantly increase in the coming years.

Although green building is more than the materials you use, your decision on which ones to use still matters. In this article, we list some of the green options that make a better alternative to the traditional materials.

1. Bamboo

Bamboo is a highly sustainable building material that is distinguished by its unrivalled tensile strength, durability and lightweight properties. Its aesthetic resemblance to wood makes it a cost-effective alternative to traditional hardwood and a green material for tiles, ceilings, privacy screens and more.

2. Wood

Wood retains its title as a historic and classic sustainable material that adds a timeless flair to buildings. Building with wood offers significant benefits as processing them into lumbers require less intensive methods in comparison with other industrial building products such as concrete, glass and steel.

3. Reclaimed Wood

Building with reclaimed wood is a responsible way to lower the amount of materials being dumped to landfills and prevent the need to cut down more trees in the process. But, probably what home builders and interior designers are after most is the depth and exquisite character only old wood can provide.

4. Cork

The renewability, versatility, near-impenetrability and fire resistant qualities of cork make it a suitable material for flooring, insulation, acoustic wall covering and more. Harvesting it doesn’t require cutting the tree. In fact, each cork tree can be stripped off of its bark up to 20 times in its entire life.

5. Mycelium

Mycelium is a mushroom-based material that is tested to be stronger than concrete, lighter than bricks and more insulated than fiberglass. What’s more, being made of fungi, it has the ability to self-heal meaning it can reduce the need for costly repairs. It’s also entirely organic and compostable.

Did You Know? Mycelium thrives underground and without light, meaning it doesn’t require external energy resource to grow.

6. Ferrock

Ferrock is another cement alternative that is made of recycled steel dust or ferrous rocks from the steel industry. It offers a greener alternative to the traditional cement manufacturing process as it absorbs carbon dioxide while it hardens and dries. Further, any structure made with Ferrock is proven to last longer, barely requiring repair and replacement.

7. Timbercrete®

Timbercrete® is an eco-friendly product made up of timber waste from several sources and concrete. The result is a material that is lighter than a solid concrete but with higher thermal insulating properties and unmatched strength. It is also user-friendly as it can be easily nailed, screwed or sawn like a regular timber and can be made to appear like sandstone, mud brick or cobblestone.

8. Wool Bricks

Wool brick is a zero-carbon product that is developed by researchers in Spain and Scotland who have added wool fibers and alginate (a natural polymer from seaweeds) to the clay of the brick. The result is a sustainable, non-toxic brick that is 37% stronger than a traditional brick.

9. Recycled Plastic

Instead of producing new materials, researches are creating lightweight concrete, tiles, insulation, lumber and more out of recycled plastics and trash. Building with recycled plastics helps lower the construction costs and provides a new use for plastic wastes while reducing greenhouse gas emissions at the same time.

10. Shipping Containers

Building houses out of shipping containers is probably the epitome of the sustainable and modern building. It makes use of the reclaimed materials that otherwise would be left to rust at the point they are retired. They can be modified into sustainable and durable houses and into endless design possibilities.

The Best Sustainable Material for You

Like anything you would decide on, you should do a careful research on which sustainable materials to use for your home. Learning more about these alternatives will lead you to the options that will be most suitable for your lifestyle and preferences as well.

Did you find this article helpful? Let us know by commenting below.

17 Tips to Make Your Home Energy-Efficient

This month’s electrical bill is painful for you to look at, just as you’ve expected. You’ve been using up a lot of energy for a while, especially with temperatures rising year after year. It’s lovely to have a well designed home. It’s even more wonderful to have a home that is both beautiful and energy-efficient. You can spend less on heating and cooling bills while remaining comfortable, and you can cut down on your carbon footprint, too. To help you get started, here are 17 steps to help you save energy.

 

17 Tips for a More Energy-Efficient Home

 

1. Change Your Most-Used Light Bulbs to LEDs. They might cost more at first, but they last much longer and use up less electrical power than their incandescent counterparts. You’ll save yourself the effort of having to purchase replacement lights as well. For outdoor lights, use CFLs instead of incandescent lamps.

2. Change Your Least-Used Light Bulbs, Too. Will you need a 100-watt bulb in a room that’s used just once a year? Downgrade such less-used lights to 60-watt or even 40-watt bulbs to save energy.

3. Use Cold Water for Laundry. This eliminates the need for a water heater. If you really need to use hot water, try to find a heater that runs on solar power.

4. Baking? Don’t Peek! The temperature drops 25° F whenever you peek. Your oven will have to work harder to bring the temperature back up.

5. When Possible, Unplug or Power Down. Your mobile phone only takes a few hours to charge, and your computer and printer don’t have to be left on all day, either.

6. Wash Dishes and Clothes at Night. Power grids are most strained during 4PM and 6PM during peak usage hours, from mid-afternoon to early in the evening. Do your washing a bit later, and you can keep the house cooler and avoid emergencies as well.

7. Switch Out Single-Pane Windows. Either replace them with more energy-efficient windows or add solar shades or tinting film to them.

8. Turn Off the Oven Early. Do this a few minutes before reaching the prescribed cooking time. Don’t worry, your food will continue cooking from its own heat.

9. Use Natural Light When Possible. For windowless rooms, you can use skylights. You may no longer need to turn on any lights during daytime.

10. Seal and Insulate Properly. Cracks and gaps can lessen the efficiency of your heating and cooling, raising energy costs by 45 percent. Avoid this by sealing gaps and cracks in rooms and around windows and doors. Also, check how your home insulation levels measure up to local codes.

11. Maintain Clean Filters. Your home systems have to do more work if their filters are dirty. Clean or replace all filters at home once a month (or every three weeks if you have pets or a dusty environment). Use a vacuum with a cleaning extension to suck up dirt, or gently wash the filter with warm water.

12. Spot the Energy Star. This sticker indicates that EPA has confirmed the product’s energy efficiency. You can find the small blue or black sticker on over 40 product categories, from refrigerators and washing machines to LED lightbulbs.

13. Use Your Shades Well. Help your heating and cooling systems out by knowing when to close or open your shades and blinds. Close your shades during warmer months for cooler indoor temperatures; open them during cooler months to let sunlight through.

14. Landscape. Deciduous trees act like shades and blinds if they sit on the south and west sides of your house. Their leaves provide shade in the summer but fall off so that the sun can come through in the winter.

15. Install Ceiling Fans. A single fan uses roughly as much energy as a 100-watt light bulb, but it can help you cut down even more on cooling and heating bills. Set your fan to spin counterclockwise in summer–you’ll find that you can comfortably set the thermostat 4°F higher. Switch the blades to spin clockwise in winter to help circulate warm air.

16. Don’t Overuse the Thermostat. Try to not lower your thermostat so much in the summer or raise it so much in the winter. If your indoor temperature is closer to outdoor temperatures, your systems will have lighter work to do. Also, don’t adjust past the desired temperature–your home will heat or cool at the same speed.

17. Paint! Brighten your room with lighter paint colors, which reflect more light. You can then switch the light bulb for a lower-wattage equivalent.

You might not notice the impact immediately, as some of these changes seem minor. However, just as a leaky faucet leads to a bigger water bill, the result of these actions builds up over time. Make efforts to go by these 17 tips, and you’ll save more energy than you thought you would.

Visit our blog regularly for tips on improving your home.

7 Steps to an Eco-Friendly Kitchen

Eco-friendly living will continue to be a hot trend in 2019, with more and more homeowners realizing how the details of their lifestyle can affect the environment in the long run. If you want to keep up with the times, you ought to update your home with sustainable choices, from your living room to your kitchen. To get you started, here are 7 steps you can take for an eco-friendly kitchen.

7 Tips for an Eco-Friendly Kitchen

1. Choose Your Appliances Wisely

Look for energy-efficient appliances. These use just enough energy to do their job and can help you save 10-50% of the normal power consumption of their regular versions. Some of them even run on renewable energy, such as solar power. One indicator of an eco-friendly appliance is the Energy Star label, which is placed on products that the Environmental Protection Agency certifies as energy-efficient.

In addition, you might want to unplug your appliances when they’re not in use. Leave them plugged in and they’ll still use up power.

2. Cook Smart

If you tend to prepare meals without much thought, you’re probably using more energy in your kitchen than you actually need. This can increase your carbon footprint without you realizing it. Here are some points to keep in mind when you’re in the kitchen:

  • Use just enough water. The more water you use, the more energy you’ll need to heat it up or get it to boiling point. Plus, excess water is wasted water.
  • Use lids when you cook. This traps heat and speeds up your cooking.
  • Try using the microwave instead of the oven when you can. This way, you can use 80% less energy to reheat the same food item.
  • Cut down on meat and dairy. It takes up a surprising amount of resources to raise a cow. Forests are sometimes even converted into pastures just to raise livestock. The more meat and dairy you consume, the bigger your carbon footprint.

3. Upgrade Cookware and Utensils

Switch out your plastic cookware for modern equivalents made of eco-friendly materials such as porcelain, glass, or wood. It’s a good thing there are several brands selling sustainable kitchen products nowadays! These include Rustic Wall Co., which produces kitchen utensils made of logging scraps, or Bambeco, which reuses its leftover materials and plants a tree for every purchase.

4. Cook With Organic Greens

Try to cook with herbs and vegetables that are fresh and free of pesticides. There are two ways to do this: buy from local green grocers or farmers’ markets, or grow your own produce.

Locally sourced greens don’t consume as much fuel just to be transported, which is a big eco-friendly plus. Be sure of whom you’re buying from, though. A large commercial farm that douses its crops with pesticides could fall under “local” if it’s just across your street. Opt for produce from small, organic farms.

You can also try your hand at growing your own herbs and vegetables. Many common vegetables are perfect for budding gardeners. These include tomatoes, cabbage, and spring onions. The additional backyard foliage will help keep the air at home fresh, too.

5. Cut Down on Food Waste

If your kitchen is truly eco-friendly, it will ideally produce minimal food waste. The following tips should keep you from throwing out too much food:

  • Shop smart. When you’re at the groceries, be realistic and buy only what you need.
  • Don’t over-serve. When scooping food onto your plate, don’t pile it up in heaps. Instead, get smaller portions and go back for seconds if needed.
  • Save your leftovers. If you’re feeling creative, you can use leftovers to whip up a fantastic meal. Just label them to keep track of how long they’ve been in your fridge.
  • Note down the food you toss out. That way you’ll know what you don’t use and take steps to avoid repeated kitchen wastage, whether that means buying smaller sizes of the same product or cutting that item out of your menu entirely.

6. Use Your Fridge Right

Your fridge uses up energy to keep food cold. If you’re aiming to have an eco-friendly kitchen, you’ll want to reduce the work your fridge has to do. Position your fridge in a cool area of your kitchen, and let food cool before putting it in the fridge.

Make sure that your fridge is still efficient, too. Defrost it regularly to keep your fridge and freezer running efficiently. Also, check if the seals around the door need to be changed. A quick test: close the door on a dollar bill. If the bill easily slides out, that means that the seals are also loose enough to let cold air seep out. Replace the seals as needed.

7. Use Green Cleaning Products

Some kitchen cleaning products have chemicals which can harm your family as well as the environment. Switch to eco-friendly alternatives with natural formulas. Homemade cleaning ingredients won’t give off strong odors, yet they can often be just as effective as store-bought cleaning products.

With these 7 steps, you’ll be on your way to an eco-friendly kitchen with a smaller carbon footprint. This sustainable lifestyle choice isn’t just a great way to welcome the new year, but it’ll help keep your home cleaner and fresher for you and your family.

For more tips on sustainable living and interior design, visit our blog regularly.

Window Treatments that are Better Alternative to Curtains


Window Treatments that are Better Alternative to Curtains

10 Window Treatments that are Better Alternative to Curtains

When you think of window treatments, curtains are probably the first things that come to your mind. But, while they remain the most straightforward option, they’re not necessarily the only choice to dress your windows.

If you’re looking for better alternatives to traditional curtains, this article lists some other options you need to consider. But, to refresh you, we also define the very reason why you need window treatments in the first place.

How Window Treatments Impact Your Home

Window treatments might be the only thing you need to transform your space. They set the mood and tone of a room, and the absence of them can make the space appear bare and naked.

Further, window treatments not only help manipulate the light that goes into your home, they also add privacy, while also aid with the cooling and insulating of a space. Now, no matter the purpose you want the treatment to serve – with the many options available – you’re sure to find one that fits your needs:

8 Window Treatment Options

1. Drapes

Although many use the terms curtains and drapes interchangeably, they’re actually two different things. But, the key difference is that drapes are typically pleated, heavy, lined and floor-length while curtains, on the other hand, are mostly lightweight, unlined and can differ in length. It is these characteristics that make drapes a more formal option.

2. Shades

Shades are a window treatment option made of continuous fabric that rolls up and down using pulley mechanism. They are often manufactured from light, colored and porous materials that filter and soften the light, instead of completely blocking it. They come in a wide range of shades, colors and materials such as polyester, cotton and linen.

3. Blinds

Instead of fabric like that of shades, blinds have slats or vanes. They are usually made of sturdier materials like wood, aluminum, composite materials or leather, and can come in different lengths, widths and orientation. Because they can be tailored according to one’s preferences, they nearly work well with any interior design.

4. Awnings

Awnings are the additional covering installed on the outside wall, often above the window and in a slanted position. Because of this structure, they offer great sun protection capabilities, without obstructing air circulation. These days, there are retractable awnings available, giving you more stylish options to update your windows.

5. Decorative Screens

A modern take on traditional curtains, decorative screens are great for shading, privacy and ventilation. They are often made from metal or wood, with intricate details engraved using laser-cutting technology. Because of its bold structure, this option allows for sunlight to filter through and cast beautiful shadows on its adjacent surfaces.

6. Shutters

Shutters offer a country-chic look to any interior design that is also functional and efficient. In fact, they’re sturdier than many other options which explains their higher price tag. But, given that you can expect them to last up to 20 years, shutters can actually be a great long-term window treatment that ensures sun-filtering and noise-blocking options.

7. Adhesive Film

When applied to window panes, adhesive films add texture to the interior, while reducing the sunlight that penetrates into your home. They are available in a range of tinted colors as well as patterns and textures so you can find one that complements your home décor. They can also be a cheaper alternative to stained or frosted glasses while providing the same benefits.

8. Vertical Garden

Finally, vertical gardens are a great multi-functional window treatment that works more favorably for those with limited horizontal space – condo owners and apartment renters, for example. Aside from allowing light to filter into the room, plants also add a touch of life and color as well as offer many health benefits for the family. Here are some low-maintenance indoor plants you can start with.

True, there is a wealth of options out there. But, given that window treatments are an investment, you should take time to see the options yourself as no amount of research will inform you how exactly they will look in your home.

Did you find this article informative? Let us know by commenting below!

Green Home Décor Brands You Should Switch To

These days, being eco-friendly is no longer limited to segregating your wastes, going paperless, avoiding plastic, and cutting down on energy consumption. It also means amending your way of shopping so it aligns with your commitment to green living.

The green way to shop, however – particularly for home decor – hasn’t always been black and white. But, until recently, the environmental consciousness of consumers has led interior designers and home décor brands to step up their game to offer an array of sustainable products.

Having placed greater emphasis not only on style but also on the environmental impact of their products, home décor brands have made it easier to be green responsible more than ever. So now, you can shop for sustainable furniture pieces confidently without worrying they’ll compromise your style.

If you’re wondering where to start with your responsible shopping, read on as we list 10 brands to shop for sustainable home décor.

1. Bambeco

Bambeco is a provider of home products crafted from either recycled, reclaimed, natural or raw materials. But, aside from harnessing these resources, the brand aims to further its green efforts by updating its processes to help restore forests, conserve water, provide safe workplaces and ultimately, achieve zero carbon footprint by 2020.

2. BottleCloth

BottleCloth is a sustainable homeware brand that makes graphic tablecloths, placemats and runners made from fabrics sourced from recycled plastic bottles. Using a multi-step process, the plastic bottles are spun into thread and woven into polyester cloth. The end result is a polyester fabric that is highly durable, low maintenance and spill-resistant products.

3. Chairish

Buying second hand is a great form of recycling. It not only avails you vintage finds for half the price but also cuts down on manufacturing demand – and Chairish, an online marketplace, lets you do just that. It has a well-curated list of vintage furniture pieces, art and home accessories, and basically everything that is dedicated to home decorating and design.

4. Cisco Home

You wouldn’t realize it right away, but Cisco Home is a sustainable furniture company that crafts its home goods with natural materials and methods that are friendly to the environment. Each product is made with pride by local artisans in Los Angeles and each of them emanates a distinct style that adds beauty to your home.

5. Colorhouse

Colorhouse is a premium paint brand that is committed to making the world more colorful but without the toxins, chemical solvents and toxic fumes that typically come with commercial paints. It offers 128 zero-VOC (volatile organic compounds), artist-crafted paints in its well-curated palettes to ensure that you have an eco-friendly alternative to your painting needs.

ALSO READ: 18 Low Maintenance Indoor Plants & Trees for Your Home

6. Coyuchi

Coyuchi is a home textile company that offers a range of luxury textiles, beddings and mattress made from organic cotton – and this claim is something more exceptional than you’d think as less than a percent of the world-produced cotton is organic. Further, despite being minimally processed, the fabrics don’t gall shouty on style and grandeur. In fact, they’re some of the softest you’ll ever lay your hands on.

7. Kazi

Kazi is an All Across Africa brand that helps African women support their families by crafting handmade goods. These include baskets and vessels handwoven in Rwanda using sweet grass and sisal sourced in East Africa – and because these plants thrive abundantly in the region, harvesting them has less impact on the environment.

8. One Nine Eight Five

One Nine Eight Five is a London-based homeware brand that focuses on print and interior textiles. It offers contemporary collection of throws, cushions, wall hangings and other accessories using ethically-sourced and eco-friendly materials. Each product celebrates world-recognized British craftsmanship and sustainable UK manufacturing.

9. Re-Found Objects

RE is a homeware brand that started as a mail order service in rural Northumbria. Today, it has grown to become one of the most-sought after home accessories and furniture brands, offering everything unusual, recycled and re-invented such as colander lamp shades, pressed metal decorations, recycled glass soap dishes, weave baskets and so much more.

10. West Elm

Brooklyn-based home design and decor brand West Elm believes in the possibility of manufacturing products through sustainable practices. It is why ever since it launched in 2002, it has committed to using products that are Fair Trade Certified, handcrafted, organic and sustainably sourced. Today, it sources its handcrafted products from more than 35 artisan groups in 15 countries, providing jobs to nearly 5,000 workers.

 

There are a lot of other home décor brands who are committed to sustainability. Whether that means creating something new out of old materials, sourcing products made by independent artisans or using sustainable resources – all their green efforts serve as a catalyst that inspire consumers to be more mindful of their choices.

If you think of any other green home décor brand that should be on this list, let us know by commenting below.

10 Christmas Window Decoration Ideas for 2018

Aiming to envelop your house in the Christmas spirit this year? Aside from putting up the good old tree in the living room and hanging stockings nearby, you need to dress your windows for the season. After all, this is one part of the house that you can see from both the inside and the outside. This means that the right decoration will be able to spread holiday cheer to visitors, neighbors, and carolers all in one go! Understandably, you can’t settle for a half-baked concept for your window decor.

You might think at first that windows will be a bit challenging to decorate. Fortunately, there are countless tried-and-tested ideas to choose from. Here are 10 window decoration ideas for you to try for Christmas 2018!

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ALSO READ: 25 Easy Christmas Decoration Ideas for Your Home

Did you find what you are looking for? Which one do you think will work best as your window display? Let us know in the comments!

Never miss the latest interior design tips and updates by regularly visiting our blog.

Tips to Avoid Interior Design Mistakes

Mistakes are common in just about anything that the human race does. After all, we are indeed human, and we err all the time.

Still, we should always try to avoid mistakes, especially when it comes to projects that are literally closer to home, like interior design.

Many believe that all interior design serves is the homeowners’ ego, that it does nothing more than provide them with a way to pompously express and show off their superior taste in decorating a home.

The truth is, interior design is more than just about getting your décor right. While making the inside of a home aesthetically pleasing is a primary goal, interior design as we know it today also makes the use of any given space better and more efficient.

ALSO READ: Interior Design Ideas for Small Spaces

Look at what interior designers do these days, and you’ll see that most of their work has fully incorporated function with form.

Considering that interior designers now factor in function with their work, it has become imperative for them and their clients to keep the mistakes to a minimum. Check it out the infographic below for tips on the most common interior design mistakes to avoid.

Common Interior Design Mistakes To Avoid

Why Your Home Should Have More Natural Light

It’s sad that we depend so much on artificial lighting when we have an inexhaustible (at least in the next few billion years) source of natural light, our very own sun.

The natural light the sun provides comes with a host of health benefits, and it’s regrettable that we aren’t getting much of it into our homes.

Sunlight’s capability to trigger Vitamins B and D production in our bodies should be one primary reason to let in more natural light. Both vitamins are instrumental in keeping our teeth and bones strong and healthy, which is why it’s puzzling why we aren’t trying that hard to get more sun.

The rays of the sun are also a natural antiseptic. Instead of soaking our entire home in synthetic antibacterial products, why don’t we just fight them off with UV rays, which also happen to help boost red and white cell production, our circulation, and our immune system?

We all should let more natural light into our homes not only for the health benefits but also to complement our interior design. Check out the infographic below for tips on how to do just that.

ALSO READ: Paint Colors for a Bedroom Without Natural Light

 

Great Ways Interior Designers Can Let Natural Light Into Your Home Infographic

Sustainable Living Blogs to Follow in 2018

It’s fair to say that humans are responsible for the climate change to a great extent. But, while significant damage has already been done to the environment, it’s never too late to prevent further destruction – and one way to do that is to modify our behaviors and adopt sustainable living practices.

Sustainable living is a lifestyle choice that leans toward limiting your carbon footprint. Some do it by switching to products that promise to be organic and eco-friendly while others take it further to the degree of creating their own natural products – cleaning, beauty and more – and even going zero-waste to make their homes as green as possible.

No matter the way you choose to go green, these actions contribute to the efforts of reducing the adverse impacts we have on the environment.

If you’re looking for advice on how to switch into an eco-friendly lifestyle, these blogs offer tips on how to make sustainable living practical, stylish and inspiring. We have carefully handpicked these blogs as they provide the most informative tips on sustainable living, ethical fashion, organic and healthy recipes, and more.

The Best Blogs that Help Us Live Eco-Consciously

1.  EcoCult

EcoCult has an honest and unapologetic yet beautiful writing style that puts readers right at home. It covers a range of sustainability issues spanning from minimal travel to sustainable apartment renovations. It also keeps tab on the upcoming green-focused events in New York that you can attend. For now, read their recommendations on the 10 eco-friendly kitchen countertop options.

2. Eco Warrior Princess

Jennifer Nini redefines what it means to live green. Started in 2010, her blog, Eco Warrior Princess discusses a wide range of topics from fashion, beauty and wellness to social justice and politics in an analytical and unbiased way. She also has podcasts that further inspire you to change the way you see sustainability. Read about her tips on how to build a living wall.

3. Going Zero Waste

Kathryn Kellogg started Going Zero Waste after a health scare forced her to make the switch to eco-living. She recalls how it started from making her own from-scratch foods, homemade cleaning products and using an all-natural deodorant. Today, the blog has all the information you need to live green. Here’s an Ultimate List of Zero Waste Swaps to start you off with.

4. Mindful Momma

Mindful Mamma was started out of the belief that anyone can live a healthy and natural lifestyle. It shows readers how to make the green changes work for them by sharing healthy recipes and tips such as how to create your own beauty and cleaning products to name a few. Her article on how to make a non-toxic bedroom proves to be particularly informative.

5. Moral Fibres

Moral Fibres is a UK-based blog that breaks down green lifestyle into 5 categories: style, food, home & gardening, family and travel. Each classification offers practical tips and advice on how to live sustainably and make greener choices. It has an article that reveals how to go almost plastic-free in the kitchen – a useful lunch hour read such as this list of the best websites for interior design inspiration.

ALSO READ: Energy Efficient Home Trends of 2016

6. Selva Beat

Selva Beat is an environmental magazine that aims to make environmentalism and conservationism part of the mainstream. Although primarily a print publication, the website offers fresh content about ethical fashion and sustainable food every week. It has an interesting article that clarifies why you should recycle glass even when it’s inconvenient.  

7. Sustainable Daisy

Sustainable Daisy is a place for eco-conscious consumers looking to read green product reviews, discover thrift shopping tips and learn new ways to live a practical and sustainable lifestyle. Each entry, such as this gam -changing thrift-shopping tips, inspires women to embrace fashion, beauty and health in the most ecologically-responsible manner.

8. Sustainably Chic

Sustainable Chic is a treasure trove of tips on sustainable fashion, beauty and lifestyle. Established in 2014, the blog is also where Natalie shares her reviews on the latest eco-friendly products and responsible brands from around the world. Meanwhile, read about her tips on how to keep chemicals away from your cooking space.

9. The Pistachio Project

Like many other sustainable living blogs, it was created out of Brittany’s desire to adopt a clean and green lifestyle for her kids. It wasn’t long until she realized that the switch is important for her as well. Her blog keeps records of everything she discovers throughout her journey such as healthy and delicious recipes and this collection of natural cleaning recipes.  

10. Zero Waste Home

Zero Waste Home is practically the blog extension of Bea Johnson’s bestselling book of the same name. In both her book and blog, Bea invalidates the misconceptions about a green lifestyle and proves that anyone can be stylish and healthy without creating waste. Learn what to pack for a zero waste travel on this inspiring blog.

There are a lot more blogs to support your move towards sustainable living. But for now, share these article with your family and friends to inspire them to live a greener lifestyle as well.

Do you have any other website to add to this list? Let us know by commenting below!

The Great American Interior Designers

One fact of life is that while you cannot be great in all career fields, you can be successful in one–this is what the 5 greatest interior designers of all time have proven.

The most recognized or highest-paid professionals in the interior design industry are inspired by the greatest. If you want to know them,  this article brings you America’s best interior designers of all time –those whose works have set a high-standard in the profession and whose names everyone in the industry recognize.

The Best Interior Designers in the US History

1. Elsie de Wolfe

1865 – 1950

Born in New York City, Elsie de Wolfe is revered as one of the first interior designers in history. Her style is best distinguished by her distaste for the overstated and formal Victorian architecture. Thus, her approach to designing is all about decluttering so it results to a spacious, streamlined look we all love today. Among her most noteworthy works include designing a host of elite social clubs, Hollywood mansions and spaces for names like Condé Nast, Cole Porter, Paul-Louis Weiller and more.

“A house should be a synthesis of comfort, practicality and tradition.”

2. Albert Hadley

1920 – 2012

Tennessee-born, Albert Hadley is celebrated as the dean of American decorators. He has mastered the modern design approach, in which he deftly pieced together a mix of styles to create a harmonious space. High-society names such as Rockefeller, Getty and much more make up his portfolio but, despite the influence, he remains firm in his principle to create liveable spaces that balance functionality and flair. Later in his career, Hadley has collaborated with Sister Parish, another icon mentioned in this list.

“The essence of interior design will always be about people and how they live.”

3. Sister Parish

1910 – 1994

The other half of the Parish-Hadley Associates, Sister Parish was a designer and socialite regarded as the mother of American Country aesthetic. She had a taste for classic European furniture that adds a dose of inviting elegance and character to every interior she touched. Along with Hadley, she was tapped to decorate the family quarters of the Kennedy White House. She is remembered for pushing a tea cart around a room, taking out things she deemed unnecessary, before starting.

“Innovation is often the ability to reach into the past and bring back what is good, what is beautiful, what is useful, what is lasting.”

4. Billy Baldwin

1903 – 1983

Billy Baldwin is probably the only interior design icon who resents being called an interior designer. He championed in the classic and modern American aesthetic at once, favoring the clean-cut instead of baroque. But, what truly sets him apart is his insistence on working with pieces his clients already owned, believing that Even when they are far from perfect, loved possessions add personality.” He was responsible for late columnist Diana Vreeland’s garden in hell blood red drawing room.

“Be faithful to your own taste, because nothing you really like is ever out of style.

5. Dorothy Draper

1889 – 1969

Dorothy Draper is an interior decorator who opened what is considered the first and most acclaimed design firm in the US. She has a taste for an elegant modern baroque aesthetic that extends to many establishments including the Fairmont and Mark Hopkins hotels in San Francisco and the cafeteria at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. But, her most celebrated work is her impressive renovation of the Greenbrier Hotel in West Virginia that now showcases a wild mash-up of colors.

“I always put in one controversial item, it makes people talk.”

 

Although it has been a long time since these interior designers passed away, they remain an icon to this day. No one can deny it, they have done more for the American interior design industry than anyone.  

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