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How You Can Find a Mattress For Your Antique Bed Frame

Antique bed frames can be gorgeous and romantic, but there’s a downside: it’s not always easy to find a mattress to fit them. Often, antique bed frames don’t conform to standard mattress sizes, so buying a mattress to fit is not as simple as it is with a regular bed frame.

However, there are mattress options for antique bed frames, including custom-made mattresses, online mattresses, and bed frame conversions.

 

The Unusual Size of Antique Bed Frames

Antique bed frames don’t always conform to standard sizes or even sizes that are commonly found among antique bed frames. Some conform to the three-quarters size, which is easier to find than a bed frame that isn’t any kind of standard size at all.

If you’re shopping for an antique bed frame, it’s a good idea to learn about standard mattress sizes. That way, you can measure your bed frame before you buy it and see if it will fit a standard mattress, or if you need to look into other options.

 

Mattress Options for Antique Bed Frames

If your bed frame fits the three quarters size mattress, your options are easier. Although this size of mattress is not typically stocked by retailers, it is available online from specialty retailers and can be ordered when you purchase your bed frame.

If your bed frame is a particularly unusual size that doesn’t fit a standard mattress or the three quarters size mattress, you will have fewer options. It is possible to have a specialty custom mattress made to fit the frame, however, these can be costly.

 

Using a Box Spring on an Antique Bed Frame

In addition to a mattress that fits your antique bed frame, you’ll need to find a box spring. Typically, older frames require a box spring or foundation to support the mattress, unlike bed frames today that often come with slats or bars that you can set your mattress on directly.

Low profile box springs conform more to the antique look than a high profile box spring, as they are more subtle and won’t make your bed sit higher than it is intended to.

 

Antique Bed Frame Conversion

If you can’t find a mattress that fits your bed frame or don’t want to invest in a custom sized mattress, you can convert your bed frame to fit a mattress made in a standard size.

Using a bed conversion kit, or creating a DIY solution, you can change the size of your bed frame so that it can be used with a standard sized mattress. This is a good long-term option, as you may keep your antique bed frame for the rest of your life, while mattresses should be replaced approximately every eight years. This can also solve the problem of finding a box spring that will fit with your bed frame.

Some antique aficionados shy away from the bed conversion option, however. Although it is practical, altering your bed frame may decrease its value as an antique piece.

 

About the Author

Sarah Johnson
Community Relations
sjohnson@tuck.com

Tuck Sleep Foundation is a community devoted to improving sleep hygiene, health and wellness through the creation and dissemination of comprehensive, unbiased, free web-based resources. Tuck has been featured on NPR, Lifehacker, Radiolab and is referenced by many colleges/universities and sleep organizations across the web.

8 Ways to Maximize a Small Walk-in Closet

Walk-in closets serve your need for an efficient storage system, but what if you can only work with a small space for all your things? If you love clothes, shoes, and accessories, it would be easy to find yourself surrounded by clutter. Without a streamlined closet, organizing gets extra difficult–and it just gets tougher with limited space.

To get out of this headache-inducing scenario, follow these tips for maximizing your walk-in closet.

 

1. Do Clear Outs Every Once in a while

Make space in your closet by doing clear outs

Closet clear outs can be done once a year or every six months. Not only will this practice save you space, but it will also keep your wardrobe updated.

 

2. Bring in the Baskets

Use baskets to maximize closet space

A basket is a go-to item to declutter and free up space in your walk-in closet. Baskets or storage boxes work best for storage systems that lack drawers. Here you can roll up your clothes, socks, and underwear–in which case it also makes a good storage system to keep hard to find items at arms reach. Lastly, to free up floor space, use stackable baskets as your primary choice.

 

3. Organize Your Drawers

Organize your drawers

At the beginning, you would see your drawers tidy and organized, but before the week ends, it always ends up in a chaotic jumble. To do away with this problem, you can use your shoe boxes as dividers so you can easily find your socks, ties, undies, and whatnot.

 

4. Make Use of Vertical Space

Fold your laundry neatly and keep them vertically

Hangers are notorious for eating up much valuable vertical space that is precious for those with a small closet. Shelves are more flexible than closet rod as they can be used for your accessories and shoes, along with folded clothes. To really save up space, go for a shelving solution that stands from floor to ceiling. Lastly, if you can’t let go of a hanger, keep it short and reserve only for overcoats.

 

 

5. But if You Need to De-Clutter, Use Hangers Efficiently

Make use of closet hangers

You can free up space if you group your short hanging clothes together. The space made available below these short hanging items can be used for storage boxes, additional drawer, or for a shoe rack. So next time you organize your hanging items, group them by length and use the space beneath the short ones for storage.

 

6. Get Some S and L Hooks


Make use of S and L hooks

Image Source: Pinterest

Make use of S and L hooks Make use of S and L hooks

Image Source: Pinterest | Pinterest

These cheap and small items are actually great space-savers. L shaped hooks work just intuitively when you want to use a blank wall such as the sides of your closet, the inside of drawers or just right up to the wall. It works best for hanging your tank tops, ties, scarves, and even your jeans. If you place a metal rod in between two hooks, you can make a closet rod to hang your clothes. The S hooks, on the other hand, can make your closet rod twice as useful. And when you run out of space to hang your S hooks, you can simply stick it up on your cubbies and shelves

 

7. Use the Corners Wisely 

Floating corner shelves with storage

Image Source: Pinterest


The most unused space in a walk-in closet are the corners. While many consider it a dead space, it doesn’t have to be especially when you need every inch of your space for storage. One way to maximize the corner is with the use of carousel for your shoes, coats, jeans, scarves and mostly anything. Another way to maximize the corner is to install a DIY shelf.

 

8. Don’t Forget the Back of the Door

Make use of space behind your door

Image Source: Pinterest

Oftentimes, the door is left untouched, when in fact you can use its vertical space for hanging pieces. Your door makes a good space to keep your scarves, ties, handbags, and belts. You can also use the cabinet door where you can place L hooks for your accessories, tank tops, and whatnot if your walk-in closet door runs out of space. Also, the space above the door makes a good place to install a shelf for your winter boots, bedsheet linens, and other items.

 

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Designer Bedroom Pictures by Lugbill Designs

Hi Everyone,

Ever wonder what some of the other projects look like? Well, starting with this post, we are going to try and do a better job of filling you in on some more of the Chicago interior designer remodels that we have done. This week, we’ll start with the bedroom designs that Lugbill Designs has completed. Enjoy!

@ 2019 Lugbill Designs   Downtown 211 W Wacker Dr, Suite 300, Chicago, IL 60606   North Side 7005 North Glenwood Avenue, Chicago, IL 60626-2812    (773) 572-9049